Moving Still

I love reading The Circuit by Francisco Jimenez with my students. It’s the story of a Mexican Family who cross the border (illegally) and the constant moving that comes with being migrant farm workers. The main character, Panchito, struggles to learn the language and strives to balance school and helping his family.  

When the author spoke to a group of educators decades later, he thanked his teachers for seeing him through the toughest period of his life and inspiring him to keep moving forward. Every year, since hearing Jimenez speak, I’ve read his book with my students and have been amazed with their ability to connect with someone whose life is so completely different from theirs. The themes are so strong despite the vast space between time and place – social inequalities, faith, friendships lost, the family dynamic – I am still moved to tears as Panchito recites the lines from The Declaration of Independence, “We hold these truths to be self evident, that all men are created equal…”  The words have not changed but we are still fighting to see them hold true. 

In the pursuit of happiness, we have decided to keep moving. It’s not going to be the UAE but it will be a new place with new opportunities. It will allow me to grow as an educator and gain experience with the International Baccalaureate Programme-a curriculum that should make me more marketable to schools abroad. This new opportunity will allow for my kids to attend top rated schools and begin dual-language study – a program I would love for them to have in New York but couldn’t manage without jumping through a lot of hoops or first selling a kidney. 

The offer is on the table. I just need to sign, scan and return. Am I ready to leave New York?

The last chapter of the book is titled “Moving still” and we have all had these moments when we’ve worked so hard for everything to finally go right, only to have it go so wrong. But if this child and his family found the will to never give up then we all can follow through with our dreams.  I have to admit, I love the evidence of learning I receive in students’ tears and cries of “Nooo!” that follow the last words on the page. 

Formative assessment: ✔️check!

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